Want to be a teacher?

Thinking of becoming a teacher in Ontario? Think about it very carefully because there is currently a surplus of teacher graduates. How could that happen — particularly when we were told during the late 1990’s that there was going to be a huge teacher shortage in the years ahead?

According to a recent Macleans article, one of the reports that made the “shortage” claim in 1998 was by Frank McIntyre, Manager of Human Resources at the Ontario College of Teachers. Interestingly, it is McIntyre himself who released an update last week which states that we actually have a “surplus” of teacher graduates — meaning there are more teachers than there are jobs. For example:

“Just over 40 per cent of 2006 grads found a fulltime job in their first year after graduating. Only 25 per cent of elementary school teachers find work.” 

While the Macleans authors claim that many of the baby boomer teachers (who retired in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s) went back on part-time contracts, taking jobs away from younger teacher education graduates — that would be wrong. While that no doubt happened in some larger Ontario boards of education, most have a policy where they refuse to hire retirees — the District Board of Niagara being one of those boards. Moreover, the teachers’ unions frown on the practice because they want new members.

In any event, how did the surplus happen and why is it significant? Well, it happened after the 1998 report because the Ontario Ministry of Education added 5000 new teacher training spots over five years — suggesting that had enrollment been left as it was there would have been enough teaching jobs to go around. It is significant because bad news does not necessarily discourage a lot of mature students and university graduates who consider applying for admission to a teachers college. Whatever the case, this latest Macleans article is required reading for anyone considering applying to teacher’s college. 

However, contrary to what many think, the current teacher surplus is not a new situation — although it certainly could have been avoided. In the late 1960’s, in Ontario at least, school boards used to have what they called “cattle auctions.” Boards of Education would set up tables in a large hotel ballroom and new teacher graduates would simply go from table to table with their resume, very quickly getting a formal “offer.”

Those days disappeared in 1970. I know because I attended teacher’s college during 1971/72 and by the time I finished, the province was in the middle of its first ever surplus.  However, I was one of the lucky ones because my specialty was visual arts, which was popular at that time because of the Hall Dennis Report “Living and Learning.” I got offered a job on the very last day of my last teaching block in late May, one of only sixteen people hired by a Niagara area public board. I started at the Grades 7 & 8 level that September, 1972 and from then on until the early to mid 1990’s there was very little hiring.

However, a good teacher can always get a job if they are really flexible and mobile — although not always a full-time permanent job. Some can even get jobs in the geographic area of their choice depending on their subject specialties. For example, there are usually teaching jobs available in the vocational subjects, the sciences, French, music and math. 

Whatever the case, if a reader is considering teacher’s college, they need to do a lot of online research.  They need to go to each board of education’s website and look to see what jobs are available now and the year before. And, check often.

As I said at the start of this article, thinking of becoming a teacher? Think again — and again — and again!

[…] 

Notes:  Having taught in a Faculty of Education, I have a few tips regarding applying for admission to any teacher training program — whether a concurrent or consecutive program. Fill out the volunteer and work experience forms VERY carefully. Include babysitting, camp work, anything at all you have done with children and make sure you can back that information up with references.  In most Canadian faculties of education, admission is based on 60% grade point average and 40% experience.

 

12 thoughts on “Want to be a teacher?

  1. This confirms what I suspected.

    Back in the mid-90’s I was an arts student in university and at the end of my second year I started thinking of what my plan would be after school.

    With an arts degree it seemed like the popular thing to do was to go on to teacher’s college, however, two things made me nervous:

    1) a heck of a lot of people I knew had graduated and were working minimum wage jobs

    2) I took a quick count of friends and noticed that 80% planned on going to teacher’s college

    I quickly suspected that the system didn’t need that many teachers, and that an arts degree only qualified me for a minimum wage job.

    As a result I left university (better to earn minimum wage with $20K in student loans than to finish school and earn minimum wage with $40K in loans), and took a 1 year college course where I was earning over $40K after 1 year.

    Meanwhile, my friends who went to teachers college are either unemployed,l working part-time, constantly moving across Ontario for a position or stuck teaching ESL and/or “special needs students”.

    Like

  2. This confirms what I suspected.

    Back in the mid-90’s I was an arts student in university and at the end of my second year I started thinking of what my plan would be after school.

    With an arts degree it seemed like the popular thing to do was to go on to teacher’s college, however, two things made me nervous:

    1) a heck of a lot of people I knew had graduated and were working minimum wage jobs

    2) I took a quick count of friends and noticed that 80% planned on going to teacher’s college

    I quickly suspected that the system didn’t need that many teachers, and that an arts degree only qualified me for a minimum wage job.

    As a result I left university (better to earn minimum wage with $20K in student loans than to finish school and earn minimum wage with $40K in loans), and took a 1 year college course where I was earning over $40K after 1 year.

    Meanwhile, my friends who went to teachers college are either unemployed,l working part-time, constantly moving across Ontario for a position or stuck teaching ESL and/or “special needs students”.

    Like

  3. Wally — I feel just as you do — no provincial conservative home in Ontario. I imagine folks must feel the same in Alberta.

    I mean McGuinty went around during the last two elections saying he was the “Education Premier” and no one called him on it apart from a few voices in the wilderness.

    Of course the teachers’ unions want full day JK/SK. That is how they will preserve jobs. Another reason they don’t want half-day kindergarten and half-day “day care” is because ECE workers are early childhood educators and under a different union.

    More split grades for sure. And, I have taught split grades. They don’t always work very well, particularly a 1/2 or a 3/4. In the former the grade ones don’t know how to read yet and in the latter the grade threes haven’t got all their basic skills yet compared to grade four which is the start of the junior level.

    How can we hold McGuinty’s feet to the fire now? I wrote this article to be a bit provocative hoping it would be picked up on google by those who were thinking about applying to a teacher education program — and then decide to go into other career fields.

    It is a real shame that non-teachers dislike teachers to such a degree. The teachers’ unions are to blame with their whining and demands, particularly during the 1997 teachers strike. People just got tired of listening that teachers had the toughest job in the world. They don’t. It’s challenging for sure, but the holidays and salary and pension benefits make up for any discomfort.

    Ever spent a night in an Ontario hospital emergency room, an ambulance or police car? Now, those are tough jobs.

    That said, teaching IS a noble profession and one I loved. It worked so much better with unions that were professional associations. Schools had “association” reps, not the equivalent of shop stewards. Clearly, teachers need to take the profession back from the unions. How? I have no idea.

    Like

  4. Wally — I feel just as you do — no provincial conservative home in Ontario. I imagine folks must feel the same in Alberta.

    I mean McGuinty went around during the last two elections saying he was the “Education Premier” and no one called him on it apart from a few voices in the wilderness.

    Of course the teachers’ unions want full day JK/SK. That is how they will preserve jobs. Another reason they don’t want half-day kindergarten and half-day “day care” is because ECE workers are early childhood educators and under a different union.

    More split grades for sure. And, I have taught split grades. They don’t always work very well, particularly a 1/2 or a 3/4. In the former the grade ones don’t know how to read yet and in the latter the grade threes haven’t got all their basic skills yet compared to grade four which is the start of the junior level.

    How can we hold McGuinty’s feet to the fire now? I wrote this article to be a bit provocative hoping it would be picked up on google by those who were thinking about applying to a teacher education program — and then decide to go into other career fields.

    It is a real shame that non-teachers dislike teachers to such a degree. The teachers’ unions are to blame with their whining and demands, particularly during the 1997 teachers strike. People just got tired of listening that teachers had the toughest job in the world. They don’t. It’s challenging for sure, but the holidays and salary and pension benefits make up for any discomfort.

    Ever spent a night in an Ontario hospital emergency room, an ambulance or police car? Now, those are tough jobs.

    That said, teaching IS a noble profession and one I loved. It worked so much better with unions that were professional associations. Schools had “association” reps, not the equivalent of shop stewards. Clearly, teachers need to take the profession back from the unions. How? I have no idea.

    Like

  5. Err how much does social engineering have to do with this story? I mean our system is eager to push up every minority and exception to the fore ahead of anyone from the majority or anyone of talent. I’m betting that what jobs there are exist for certain kinds of people.

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  6. Err how much does social engineering have to do with this story? I mean our system is eager to push up every minority and exception to the fore ahead of anyone from the majority or anyone of talent. I’m betting that what jobs there are exist for certain kinds of people.

    Like

  7. Actually it isn;t that hard to get full-time job teaching in Ontario. If your parents are teachers. Otherwise, volunteer as a teacher to gather brownie points. In otherwords, work for free.

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  8. Actually it isn;t that hard to get full-time job teaching in Ontario. If your parents are teachers. Otherwise, volunteer as a teacher to gather brownie points. In otherwords, work for free.

    Like

  9. I’m happy this discussion has gravitated to the true modern day purpose of school: social engineering of our youth. Then we have to ask the obvious question for what kind of future are they brainwashing our youth? Global socialism?

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  10. I’m happy this discussion has gravitated to the true modern day purpose of school: social engineering of our youth. Then we have to ask the obvious question for what kind of future are they brainwashing our youth? Global socialism?

    Like

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