University versus college or the trades?

Rachel Sa’s recent Toronto Sun column was titled “Smarty pants — try a trade.” She tells the story of when her sister, who wanted to go into their family’s successful hair styling business had a discussion with a high school guidance counsellor: “Why would you go to hairstyling school?” the teacher asked. “You’re smart — you should go to university.”

Why the immediate prejudice against anything resembling a trade?  Why the assumption that you don’t need to be smart to go into the trades? Just think about Mike Holmes of Holmes on Homes and his “Make it Right” productions and you realize just how extremely important a smart, talented and honest tradesperson really is. In fact, as a society, we can’t do without them. Yet, in the Greater Toronto area alone, Sa says there is a projected shortage.  As she writes:

In Tuesday’s [Ontario] provincial budget, the government has pledged $1.5 billion towards a new Skills to Jobs Action Plan designed to re-train workers for skilled jobs. There is a projected shortage of 354,000 skilled workers in Ontario by 2025. All those cranes that have mushroomed up around the GTA need people to operate them.”

So, parents and young people, I would encourage you to look at all the options available and not automatically turn away from a skills-based college diploma program or a trades apprenticeship. Opportunities are out there and university is not for everyone, no matter how “smart” a person may be because to be a successful tradesperson, you have to be just as smart and capable. The old idea of “being good with your hands” no longer holds. Computers and the latest technology are also used in the trades.

Moreover, if success is decided by income level and job satisfaction, many of those in the trades actually make more money and have better benefits than the types of jobs many students get after university — particularly those that are unionized. Like everything else, it depends on the person, the major students study in university and the job they get later.

Both my husband and I are university educated, each of us with several degrees between us. Yet, our children and children-in-law do not. They are in the trades, very talented at what they do and run successful businesses. Two are finish carpenters and one a brick layer and they are in demand and respected by their customers. One is actually learning the business from the ground up, a well established company that is now into its third generation.

The National Post had an article back on March 4th, 2008 that highlighted the Statistics Canada 2006 census on labour market activities, education and the language of work. They wrote:

“Only 10% of young adults aged 25 to 34 had a trade certificate in 2006, compared to 13% of adults aged 55 to 64.” Yet “the construction trades grew by 52,000 to 143,000 over the census period.”

University versus college or the trades? It should depend on the talents and interests of each young person, not a prejudice in favour of one over the other. All are worthy and honourable choices.

6 thoughts on “University versus college or the trades?

  1. This post explains why I was against the liberal RESP bill. I think one reason trades are looked down on by educators is because, one- you have to work long hours, and two – you have to do your job well. Can’t just show up and put in hours. A tradesman can take pride in his finished product and see what he has accomplished. How many teachers ever see the finished product they start with. What is the finished product of a divorce lawyer-broken family-huge payments for the husband/father, vindictive spouse, and in some cases the death of the children by the spouse who lost any custody. What is the finished product of a defense lawyer who has used every trick in the book to get a guilty client back on the streets.
    Perhaps a better bill would be a RESTP, registered educational savings trades plan.
    Those looking down their nose at the trades should stop and think, where do they turn when their car breaks down, or their plumbing goes on the blink.

    Like

  2. This post explains why I was against the liberal RESP bill. I think one reason trades are looked down on by educators is because, one- you have to work long hours, and two – you have to do your job well. Can’t just show up and put in hours. A tradesman can take pride in his finished product and see what he has accomplished. How many teachers ever see the finished product they start with. What is the finished product of a divorce lawyer-broken family-huge payments for the husband/father, vindictive spouse, and in some cases the death of the children by the spouse who lost any custody. What is the finished product of a defense lawyer who has used every trick in the book to get a guilty client back on the streets.
    Perhaps a better bill would be a RESTP, registered educational savings trades plan.
    Those looking down their nose at the trades should stop and think, where do they turn when their car breaks down, or their plumbing goes on the blink.

    Like

  3. I have a university degree, but sometimes over the last 30 years I’ve wondered if all that money and work was really worth it, because it was never a field for a “permanent” job, anywhere. It was short-term contract all the time. If I wanted to raise a family, I was never home for months at a time. My first marriage lasted 1.5 years. An engineer asked me once “if I had the chance would I do it again?” I said nope, I’d own 40 – 50 Cats. That’s Catepillar TM, cats. I’d be retired and rich now. I think a trade for any young girl or boy is a great idea, if they are not inclined to a university education, you can always find work somewhere. Unless your field is in demand and economies are cyclical,you could be driving a cab to make ends meet, while you wait for that big opportunity, or take up a trade.

    Like

  4. I have a university degree, but sometimes over the last 30 years I’ve wondered if all that money and work was really worth it, because it was never a field for a “permanent” job, anywhere. It was short-term contract all the time. If I wanted to raise a family, I was never home for months at a time. My first marriage lasted 1.5 years. An engineer asked me once “if I had the chance would I do it again?” I said nope, I’d own 40 – 50 Cats. That’s Catepillar TM, cats. I’d be retired and rich now. I think a trade for any young girl or boy is a great idea, if they are not inclined to a university education, you can always find work somewhere. Unless your field is in demand and economies are cyclical,you could be driving a cab to make ends meet, while you wait for that big opportunity, or take up a trade.

    Like

  5. About 10 years ago I heard that the surest way to get rich is to get into the trades.

    The reason is that trades people often end up starting their own businesses – plumbing, electrical, earth moving, air conditioning, transportation, automotive, whatever. The yellow pages are full of ’em.

    With time these businesses grow. When these people retire, their little businesses have often morphed into a multi-million dollar concerns.

    Most people probably think doctoring and lawyering are the way to riches. Nope. Go blue collar, young man.

    Like

  6. About 10 years ago I heard that the surest way to get rich is to get into the trades.

    The reason is that trades people often end up starting their own businesses – plumbing, electrical, earth moving, air conditioning, transportation, automotive, whatever. The yellow pages are full of ’em.

    With time these businesses grow. When these people retire, their little businesses have often morphed into a multi-million dollar concerns.

    Most people probably think doctoring and lawyering are the way to riches. Nope. Go blue collar, young man.

    Like

Comments are closed.