Mike Holmes making it right for First Nations

Good on Mike Holmes! Rather than simply build sustainable homes in First Nations communities, he is going to show them “how” to do it so that they will learn the knowledge and skills-sets they need to build their own sustainable homes.

Whether it was the first HGTV Holmes on Homes program, Holmes in New Orleans, or the more recent “Holmes Inspection,” I am a fan of Canada’s famous contractor and now celebrity. I like him because he is a no-nonsense kind of guy who just gets the job done. He just looks out at the camera and speaks with conviction (and sometimes moral outrage) in a way that makes it look like he is talking directly to each one of us.

The trademarked phrase “Make It Right” will alway be associated with Holmes now, although it could just as easily be “helping people to help themselves.” Now, as before, he is using his celebrity to change lives, this time in a First Nations community in Ontario — apparently following on what he has been doing in Alberta.

Here is what Macleans writes on this latest venture, which will no doubt make it onto TV at some point. Holmes says:

“’If it was 50 homes being built, our target date [for completion] would be one year.’ The funding for the pilot, as well as future projects, will come entirely from the First Nations communities. ‘Certain bands and certain areas have been putting money aside for restructuring,’ he says. The ultimate goal: to provide those in First Nations communities with the tools to rebuild. ‘I don’t mean a hammer, a level and a square,’ he says. ‘I mean an education system so they can do it themselves.’”

Mike Holmes. Continuing to make it right. We need more practical hands-on educators like that!

5 thoughts on “Mike Holmes making it right for First Nations

  1. It’s not just building the homes: it’s maintaining them. Many years ago I heard an Indian leader boast that they were not as the whites, contiually having to paint and pretty up their places. Unfortunately, I was not brave enough t0 point out that paint is not just pretty; it’s a preservative. Wood rots. Untreated wood rots faster. If my father put off painting the shingle roof too long, the snow didn’t slide off as fast, meltwater (from the sun) crept under the shingles, and the result was rot in the rafters and leakage onto the main level.

    I very much admire Mr Holmes and wish him well on this venture. However, repairs are going to have to be a major topic if he is to succeed.

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