Grand opening of Bayfield’s Virtual High School June 1st at 6pm

Click for website.

Click for website.

Interested in alternative education and technological innovation AND can get to Bayfield, Ontario on the eastern shores of Lake Huron?

Well, there will be a grand opening ceremony tomorrow, June 1st, 2012 for Virtual High School’s (VHS) new community presence at 27 Main Street North in Bayfield.

Only available online or by telephone up to this point, VHS will now have an administration address. As readers can see in the photo image above, the office building is a restoration of what was once the Martha Ritz hotel.

The ribbon cutting will be tomorrow at 6pm sharp, with tours of the facility until 9pm.

I wrote about Bayfield Ontario’s Virtual High School in 2010 as an example of an alternative high school. Well, it seems a lot has happened in just two years.

Here, for example, is VHS’s main page.  It now has 64 high school credit courses, all approved by the Ontario Ministry of Education, an administrative staff of 14 and 60 teachers (all accredited members of the Ontario College of Teachers).  Unlike most high schools, however, the teachers are located all over Ontario.

Of course, most important of all, there are some 4,600 active students — a phenomenal number by any standard!

Congratulations to Principal Steve Baker and his team at VHS, not only for being such technological innovators, but for providing an alternative choice to students who are self-directed and/or prefer to learn in a virtual way!

For further information or to contact the school for a later tour of the new facility, the telephone numbers are at this link.

7 thoughts on “Grand opening of Bayfield’s Virtual High School June 1st at 6pm

  1. Well Anon1152, given VHS has over 4000 active students, it seems that many prefer the virtual choice.

    I personally liked the social aspect of school, so I don’t think it would have been something I would have chosen back then. But, times are different today so who knows — if I had been born at a different time?

    Online courses and even degrees are now the norm of course for both undergrad and grad. However, having taught grad I would still prefer an option where there is some interaction between students because learning at that level is just as much about learning from each other than books and papers.

    I know some online universities do it but I have never experienced it myself, although I did work with several teachers who were completing their Master’s thesis projects, whereby we did a lot of back and forth via e-mail attachment.

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  2. But Sandy what about “socialization”? Some day I will “text” you the answer but I understand I need a cell phone to do texting and I don’t have one yet!! I guess this is “virtually” like sitting at the feet of the great philosophers (only in your PJs)! LOL

    Kidding of course and I wish the school all the best … my only wish is that “people with ear buds” would say hello as we pass on our walk of life!

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  3. Nice to hear from you WCT. Most young people who take the VHS courses are actually in a regular high school. They might just be behind a credit or two and its one way to get what they missed. Or, sometimes foreign students take pre-requisite courses at home before coming to Canada. Few would do their whole diploma that way, although some might for health reasons. I know of several examples of both of my examples. So, a virtual school is definitely needed.

    There are many others as well, for parents who are homeschooling, for ESL and so on. In fact, I don’t have the link but there are even advertisements for online teachers here and abroad.

    A whole new world!

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  4. My daughter is starting her 4th year at UW in the fall. She has investigated the possibile courses and plans to take all on line courses for her last term, and at least 2 for the September – December term. Saves on gas and parking, and she can work at her own pace. I guess she has had enough of the social aspect in the 1st 3 years.

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  5. That’s great Greg. The one drawback of online courses is that learning also involves discussing what you are studying. Learn by doing as it were. It is also a way to have learning stick.

    If a person, like your daughter, who has had plenty of exposure to her subject specialty already, then online courses are great.

    However, I have my doubts about someone taking only an online degree, unless it is set up in such a way that Skype can be used for discussions. Some programs also require practical experience out in the field. So, if that field experience and Skype discussions were part of an online program, then it would likely be ideal.

    Like you say, no parking problems. And, as all of us know who have attended or taught in universities, parking is inevitably a HUGE problem!!!

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